Vaccination

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Basic Information according to Wikipedia

Vaccination is the administration of a vaccine to help the immune system develop protection from a disease. Vaccines contain a microorganism in a weakened or killed state, or proteins or toxins from the organism. In stimulating the body's adaptive immunity, it helps prevent sickness from an infectious disease. When a sufficiently large percentage of a population has been vaccinated, herd immunity is considered to result in case the disease is directly contagious.[1] The pharmaceutical companies and official promotors of vaccination maintain that effectiveness of vaccination has been widely studied and verified.[2][3] By a large part of the medical and pharmaceutical establishment and industry vaccination is considered to be the most effective method of preventing infectious diseases.

Smallpox was most likely the first disease people tried to prevent by inoculation[4][5] and was the first disease for which a vaccine was produced. The smallpox vaccine was invented in 1796 by English physician Edward Jenner and although at least six people had used the same principles years earlier he was the first to publish evidence that it was effective and to provide advice on its production.[6] Louis Pasteur furthered the concept through his work in microbiology. The immunization was called vaccination because it was derived from a virus affecting cows (Template:Lang-la 'cow').[4][6] Smallpox was a contagious and deadly disease, causing the deaths of 20–60% of infected adults and over 80% of infected children.[7] When smallpox was finally eradicated in 1979, it had already killed an estimated 300–500 million people[8][9][10] in the 20th century.

In common speech, vaccination and immunization have a similar meaning. This distinguishes it from inoculation, which uses unweakened live pathogens, although in common usage either can refer to an immunization. Vaccination efforts have been met with some controversy on scientific, ethical, political, medical safety, and religious grounds. In rare cases, vaccinations can injure people.[11] In the United States, people may receive compensation for those injuries under the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program. Early success brought widespread acceptance, and mass vaccination campaigns have greatly reduced the incidence of many diseases in numerous geographic regions.

Different Problems with Vaccination

DNA contamination causes auto-immune response

Following is a text of a genetical engeneer about possible DNA contamination in vaccines, extracted from a youtube lecture:

"I'm sure all of you are aware what a vaccine is. Essentially, it's a virus in liquid that we inject. The viruses are long strands of RNA or DNA, thousands of RNA molecules or DNA molecules. It's too expensive to make the virus in a test tube. What the pharmaceutical companies do is they mimic nature's way of making viruses and they infect cells. The cells produce the virus and then they try to purify the virus away from the cellular material to put it in our final product. Anyone who has ever taken chemistry would know that no final product is ever pure. You would particularly know that when you go from a small scale manufacturing or production batch to a large scale batch your impurities increase dramatically in your final product.

In your final product there are contaminants from the cell that was used to make the virus. When we use chicken egg embryos there are contaminants from the chicken egg in the final vaccine. That chicken contaminant level is not human. We recognize it as foreign, we mount an immune response to it, and we eliminate it from our bodies. In the case when we are using human fetal cells to manufacture the vaccines, we have fragments of a retrovirus (because one of the babies from which the cells were taken had a retrovirus), we have large amounts of fragments of human DNA (primitive human DNA because it's fetal DNA) and in some cases the contaminants are at higher levels than the active ingredient of the vaccine.

That's alarming. What does that mean to a child who is injected with those materials? Two things are very possible and the science that demonstrates that these things happen is well established.

There's a chance that the child would have an immune response to that fetal material, because it's so close to that child (because it's human) that that immune response could turn on the child itself and become an autoimmune response. That's one danger. The second danger, which we believe is playing the predominant role in damage done to children, is a process called insertional mutagenesis. Those DNA fragments can insert into the genome of the child, create subsequent mutations and create problems. There are 30-40+ papers now looking at the genomes of children who have developed autism. These children have hundreds of "de novo" mutations. Those are mutations that their parents do not have. Science has established very clearly what can cause hundreds of diverse de novo mutations: radiation exposure, chemical toxin exposure, and foreign DNA exposure. The only one of those three that corresponds with the change points worldwide are the fetal manufactured contaminants."

— Theresa Deisher Ph.D, Genetic Engineer, President of Sound Choice Pharmaceuticals Institute, President & CEO of AVM Biotech

Important Sources of Vaccination Critical Material

 

 

References:

  1. This is not the case e.g. for Tetanus and Hep B
  2. Anthony E. Fiore and Carolyn B. Bridges and Nancy J. Cox: Seasonal influenza vaccines, in: Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology, Vol. 333, p.43–82, 2009, ISBN 978-3-540-92164-6
  3. Chang Y, Brewer NT, Rinas AC, Schmitt K, Smith JS: Evaluating the impact of human papillomavirus vaccines, in: Vaccine Vol. 27, Issue 32, p.4355–62, July 2009
  4. 4.0 4.1 Template:Cite journal
  5. Template:Cite journal
  6. 6.0 6.1 Template:Cite journal
  7. Template:Cite journal
  8. Template:Cite book
  9. Template:Cite web
  10. How Poxviruses Such As Smallpox Evade The Immune System, ScienceDaily.com, 1 February 2008.
  11. Template:Cite web